Sixth Form Curriculum

We have a strong Sixth Form where results and performance are consistently excellent, this summer seeing the best ever results! The Sixth Form is a special and distinctive part of the College community and we are extremely proud of its success. The majority of students who join our Sixth Form go on to study at university and we have a very good track record of supporting students to gain entry into some of the leading universities in the country.

 

Sixth Form Prospectus

Please download a copy of our Sixth Form Prospectus in PDF format to learn more.

 

Course Information

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Fine Art (PDF)

AQA A-Level Fine Art

Head of Department: Mrs. S. Nataly

Department Information

​The Department consists of 2 large Art  teaching rooms. There is also an A level room/3D/ ceramic room where students have their own working space which they can use during lessons and their own time. There is a new gallery space which is continually used to display their current work in progress. Students have the opportunity to display their work in a public exhibition in February.

Why study this course?

Fine Art offers opportunities to use your creativity and express yourself through a variety of media. It is about looking, learning, thinking, communicating and developing your awareness of the visual world. It will enable you to work independently and explore work by other artists to develop your own personal and imaginative work.

Aims of the course

Fine Art is about developing your understanding of the visual world, learning practical skills and responding to ideas and issues in ways that are personal to you. You will develop an independent, enquiring and creative mind and skills in a variety of different media including drawing, painting, printing, photography, 3D, mixed media, photography.

How am I assessed?

A Level consists of 2 components:

Component 1- Students are internally assessed at specific points throughout Component 1- Personal Investigation. There is a 15 hour exam in December to prepare them for the externally set exam where students produce a final response.

Component 2-Each student is asked to respond to a given theme set by the exam board in his/her own personal way.  Students are given a minimum of 6 weeks to plan a final piece to be executed within the timed exam (15 hrs).

All work is assessed and moderated internally throughout the year before the Exam Board then moderates both Components after the final exam.

Where does this course lead?

​Access to Art Foundation and Art based degrees.

Artist, designer, illustrator, annimator, graphic artist, fashion illustration, archtect, tattoo artist, teacher, art therapist, theatre design. Industries and companies recognise the importance of students who have studied the Arts which demonstrate a creative, imaginative, independent and enquiring mind.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Biology (PDF)

OCR A-Level Biology

Raising Standards Leader – Mr Daniel Finn

Department Information

The study of A level Biology with our experienced and well qualified Biology teachers begins with an introduction to the wide-ranging practical applications of Biology.  Our well-resourced department allows all lessons to be conducted in laboratories using specialist, technical equipment for the practical endorsement component of the course.  All students are issued with a course text on entry to the department and are expected to make regular use of the Pixl strategies provided to support and enhance their progress.

Why study this course?

This course suits both students who have studied Combined Science at GCSE, or have studied the sciences as separate subjects. The study of any of the sciences shows a level of commitment and ability that few other subjects demand. You need to be confident in your practical abilities as well as being interested in how Science is used by society. Biologists generally study several science disciplines and even disciplines which may at first seem unrelated to Biology, for example statistics, or Computing.  This is an important point which can enhance the employment prospects of Biologists over other science graduates.

Aims of the course

As we go into the 21st century, concern grows for the well-being of our planet and ourselves. As a result, Biology is now a more challenging and rewarding subject to study than ever before. Biology deals with understanding and making the most of the working of nature and it allows for endless career opportunities.

Course outline

The course is divided into six main modules that build on the concepts and skills developed at GCSE:

Development of practical skills in Biology             Foundations in Biology

Exchange and transport                                           Biodiversity, evolution, and disease.

Communication, homeostasis and energy            Genetics, evolution and ecosystems

How am I assessed?

There are 3 exams at the end of the course:

  • Biological processes - 100 marks 2hr 15min written exam assessing content of modules 1, 2, 3, 5   37% of full A-level
  • Biological diversity - 100 marks 2hr 15min written exam assessing content of modules 1, 2, 4, 6   37% of full A-level
  • Unified biology - 70 marks 1hr 30min written exam assessing content of modules 1-6   26% of full A-level
  • Practical endorsement in biology (not examined)

Where does this course lead?

The main areas of biological employment include the health services, environmental protection, biological industries, education and research. ​

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Business (PDF)

OCR A-Level Business Studies

Head of Department: Mr M. Lee

Department Information

The Department is staffed with very experienced and passionate Business qualified teachers.  We have an excellent record of results in Key Stage 5 and our students are very positive about the subject.  Business has its own suite of classrooms which are well resourced with both digital and print resources. ​

Why study this course?

Regardless as to the career path you will eventually choose - you will work within a business.  Therfore, having an understanding of how a business works is critical to your success. This course provides you with an in depth understanding of how businesses of all sizes work and the decisions that have to be made.  One day it may be you making those decisions!

Aims of the course

Central to this course is developing the knowledge and understanding of the key aspects of business decision-making and the impacts these have on the business and its stakeholders.  The course encourages students to develop a critical understanding of organisations and their ability to meet society’s needs and wants.  The course generates enterprising and creative approaches to business opportunities, problems and issues. Students become aware of the ethical dilemmas and responsibilities faced by organisations and individuals and will take a more strategic view of business opportunities, problems and issues.

Course outline

A Level Business takes the student on a journey from discovering what skills and qualities an entrepreneur needs in order to succeed to what type of business ownership is most appropriate and how the functions of that business will operate.  Understanding the external environment is also covered as well as how global businesses differ from local or national businesses.

How am I assessed?

There are 3 equally weighted external examinations at the end of the course.

Operating in a Local Environment

The UK Business Environment

The Global Business Environment

Where does this course lead?

Universities welcome this subject for application to study a wide range of degrees such as Business, Accounting, Economics, Law and Management Studies.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Chemistry (PDF)

OCR A-Level Chemistry

Raising Standard Leader – Dr Clare Francis

Department Information

The study of A level Chemistry with our experienced and well qualified Chemistry teachers begins with an introduction to the wide-ranging practical applications of Chemistry.  Our well-resourced department allows all lessons to be conducted in laboratories using specialist, technical equipment for the practical endorsement component of the course.  All students are issued with a course text on entry to the department and are expected to make regular use of the Pixl strategies provided to support and enhance their progress.

Why study this course?

Chemistry underpins the world around us, so being able to study chemistry is like learning why the world is how it is. Chemistry fits well with the other science A-levels and Mathematics, and is usually the required A level for most medical science courses at University, particularly Medicine, Dentistry and Veterinary Science. You will be able to gain a range of skills from problem solving, team work, practical and mathematical which will help you in any chosen career.

Aims of the course

To develop logical thinking and resilient learners that can facilitate the advances of Chemistry in all applications of our rapidly expanding world.

Course outline

Content is split into six teaching modules:

Module 1 – Development of practical skills in chemistry

Module 2 – Foundations in chemistry

Module 3 – Periodic table and energy

Module 4 – Core organic chemistry

Module 5 – Physical chemistry and transition elements

Module 6 – Organic chemistry and analysis ​

How am I assessed?

Progress is monitored by regular 6-week tests and assessed homework plus Pixl support lessons to be completed outside of the laboratory in student’s personal study periods.

There are 3 exams at the end of the course:

  • Periodic Table, elements and physical chemistry - 100 marks 2hr 15min written exam assessing content of modules 1, 2, 3, 5   37% of full A-level
  • Synthesis and analytical techniques - 100 marks 2hr 15min written exam assessing content of modules 1, 2, 4, 6   37% of full A-level
  • Unified chemistry - 70 marks 1hr 30min written exam assessing content of modules 1-6   26% of full A-level
  • Practical endorsement in chemistry (not examined)

Where does this course lead?

Choosing Chemistry as a career path can lead into the pharmaceutical, food, plastics, engineering, metals, geological and manufacturing industries. The skills developed throughout the course are a good grounding for many other professions.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Computer Science (PDF)

OCR A-Level Computer Science

Head of Department: Mr. G. Taylor

Department Information

​Up to date Intel NUC Computers specifically for Computing & ICT students. Software and resources supporting a range of Computing Disciplines from Games Programming (Unity, GameMaker), AI and Drone Development, AR/VR App Development, Software and App Development (Visual Studio 2012) to software packages including Photoshop, Macromedia, Office

Why study this course?

Studying Computer Science will open doors for courses including: ​Computer Programmer, Application Developer, Software Engineer, Games Designer, Web Developer, Computer Science Lecturer/Teacher.

Aims of the course

To produce programmers equipped with an understanding of:

  • fundamental computational concepts underlying most programming languages
  • a range of problem solving techniques using computers
  • the role of programming within the overall software development process
  • attitudes and working practices appropriate for a professional programmer

Course outline

Students undertake three units during the A Level Computer Science course, two theory units and a practical based unit.

Component 1

The characteristics of contemporary processors, input, output and storage devices

Software and software development

Exchanging data

Data types, data structures and algorithms

Legal, moral, cultural and ethical issues

Component 2:

Elements of computational thinking

Programming and problem solving

Pattern recognition, abstraction and decomposition

Algorithm design and efficiency

Standard algorithms.​​

Component 3:

Individual project:

Design and develop a solution to a problem of their own choosing.

Students are open to create an app, software package or an executable program that will solve a real world problem.

They will communicate with a real end user to ensure specific criteria is met.

How am I assessed?

Written examination (Component 1) (40%)

Written examination (Component 2) (40%)​

Individual Project (Component 3)​ (20%)

Where does this course lead?

​A wide range of professions including Programmer, Application Developer, Software Engineer, Games Designer, Web Developer, Computer Science Lecturer/Teacher​​​​

Please click here to download the course information document for BTEC Dance (PDF)

EDEXCEL BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate in Performing Arts (Dance)

Head of Department: Mrs L.Myles

Department Information

The department is staffed with experienced and enthusiastic teachers. Results at KS 4 and KS 5 are very good, and the Dance courses have proved very popular. There are opportunities to get involved in extra-curricular dance activities as well as showcasing work in live dance show performance.

Why study this course?

The BTEC level 3 Extended Certificate in Performing Arts - Dance is best suited to students who want to improve their physical and interpretive dance skills using a range of dance styles and techniques. Students who study this course will also learn how to use and develop choreographic devices in order to create innovative and abstract stylistic pieces of dance. Students will critically evaluate their own and others dance performance as well as compare and contrast existing work. Students who study this course often go on to study dance at Further/Higher Education, work in the dance industry through performance, teaching or choreography.

Aims of the course

The Aim of the BTEC Level 3 Extended Certificate in Performing Arts - Dance is for students to develop their physical and interpretive dance skills through a range of dance styles. Students will also improve their choreography skills through participation in workshops and rehearsals. Students will develop an ability to assess dance through dance appreciation and by critically evaluating their own and existing work.

Course outline

This course is designed for students who wish to study dance at Post 16 on a Level 3 Extended Certificate and is an ideal choice for any student considering a career in dance or dance teaching.  It extends the knowledge that pupils develop from the Level 2 Tech Award in Performing Arts (Dance).This is equivalent to one GCE A Level, however the grading criteria is slightly  different to A Levels in that the awards are either PASS, MERIT or DISTINCTION/DISTINCTION *.  This is a 360-guided learning-hours qualification

How am I assessed?​

Mandatory units:

Group Performance Workshop

Developing Skills and Techniques for Performance

Optional units Selected From:

Classical Ballet Technique

Tap Dance Technique

Jazz Dance Technique

Street dance Teachnique

Contemporary Dance Technique

Healthy Dancer

Choreogrpahy for Live Performance

Improvisation

Musical Theatre Techniques

Where does this course lead?

​You may go on to study a HND, degree or diploma at a higher level. This can lead to a career in teaching, community dance worker, and different types of arts administration posts, choreographing and performing.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Drama and Theatre Studies (PDF)

WJEC Eduqas A-Level Drama and Theatre

Head of Department: Mrs. L Hall

Department Information

​The Drama Department has excellent facilities at CLCC. Three performance spaces and techincal equipment which allows students to be assessed on lighting and sound.

Why study this course?

Drama will give you transferable skills which will equip you for an ever changing employment landscape. Communication, problem sloving, then ability to self-manage and work as part of a team and creativity, are highly values by employers. Many of our students have successful careers outside of Drama and aknowldeg that taking the course has helped them to be successful in careers such as law and criminology in addition to taking up careers in the Performing Arts and Arts Adminstration sectors.

Course outline

We approach the study of Drama and Theatre from three key viewpoints:

1.Actor– As an actor you will develop your acting skills – interpretation of character, exploration of style, voice, physicality and stage relationships with others.

2.Director– As a director you will develop your interpretative skills when working with plays. You will instigate ideas for performance and develop a directorial vision when working on original material or text.

3.Designer – As a designer you will develop your design skills and consider how design impacts upon an audience. You will develop ideas for set creation, costume, lighting and sound design.

A desire to particpate in and attend live theatre is essential in this course.

How am I assessed?

Drama is a subject that requires commitment and dedication; you will be working individually, in pairs, small groups and whole group on assessment tasks and classwork. Your achievement in this subject is dependent upon excellent attendance, punctuality and effort. You will learn in a supportive atmosphere, using a variety of assessment methods depending on the options chosen:

  • Acting skills in performance and rehearsal
  • Technical skills in performance and design
  • Evaluation skills thorugh continuous prose, portfolio or blog
  • Formal written skills
  • Your ability to review live theatre

You will be formally examined on each unit that you study either by your teacher, a visiting examiner or in a written exam at the end of the second year.

Where does this course lead?

​Drama and Theatre Studies can lead to further study in drama, theatre studies and performing arts in higher education at Degree or HND level or drama school. It can be used as part of your course to broaden your studies and may lead on to a career in the performing arts industries.  One measure of the subject's regards is that it is highly rated by Cambridge University, amoung others, for Law courses.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level English Literature (PDF)

WJEC Eduqas A-Level English Literature

Head of Department: Ms. A. Lancini

Department Information

English Literature is one of the more popular A Levels offered by the college. All teachers are experienced and we get consistently good results. Students enjoy their lessons as we use a range of teaching methods, where group discussion is encouraged. All groups are taught by two experienced teachers, and will study a range of texts from 1300 to the present day.

Why study this course?

This specification is based on a conviction that the study of literature should encourage enjoyment of literary studies based on an informed personal response to a range of texts. It provides learners with an introduction to the discipline of advanced literary studies and presents opportunities for reading widely and for making creative and informed responses to each of the major literary genres of poetry, prose and drama.

Aims of the course

The WJEC Eduqas A level in English Literature encourages learners to develop their interest in and enjoyment of literature and literary studies as they:

  • read widely and independently both set texts and coursework texts
  • engage critically and creatively with a substantial body of texts and ways of responding to them
  • develop and effectively apply their knowledge of literary analysis and evaluation
  • explore the contexts of the texts they are reading and others’ interpretations of them
  • undertake independent and sustained studies to deepen their appreciation and understanding of English Literature, including its changing traditions.

Course outline

​Students will study a minimum of eight texts at A Level, and experience a wide range of reading in poetry, prose and drama.

How am I assessed?

The course is comprised of four units of work:

Component One – 2 hour exam: Poetry Pre 1900 & Post 1900

Component Two – 2 hour exam:  Shakespeare & Section B: Drama

Component Three – 2 hour exam: Unseen prose and unseen poetry

Component Four - One 2500-3500 word comparative coursework essay

Where does this course lead?

​A wide range of degree courses and careers.  English Literature is a well-respected A level by all universities.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Fashion and Textiles (PDF)

Design and Technology: A Level Fashion and Textiles

Head of Department: Ms S Denston

Department Information

In order to correspond with industry working practices, you will be required to gain knowledge and understanding of the fashion and textiles industry, through practical experimentation and theory work which also links into the theory for the exam board set exam at the end of year 13. Students will complete and design and making project and sit two externally set examinations.

Why study this course?

If you want to pursue a career in the creative industries. This course is a hands on subject that could lead to a career within fashion or textiles industry, with a multitude of transferable skills. Students will gain a real understanding of what it means to be a designer, along with the skills sought by both higher education and employers.

Course outline

A-level Fashion and Textiles requires students to engage in both practical and theoretical study.

They will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by producing prototypes of their choice.

Year 12
Students enhance the skills already gained from GCSE. This is in the form of a design and make brief

  • Practice NEA project to a set design brief
  • Drawing and practical skills enhancement, building on skills learned at GCSE.
  • Theoretical exam preparation for mock exams in February of year 12
  • Start NEA - substantial design and make project worth 50% of their A-level

Year 13
Continue with NEA - substantial design and make project worth 50% of their A-level.

Investigation into the fashion and textiles theory, in preparation for A level exams.

  • Exam - Technical principles worth 30% of A level (2.5 hours)
  • Exam - Designing and making principles.worth 20% of A level (1.5 hours)

Where does this course lead?

​This qualification can lead to a place at university in an Art and Design related course. We have had many of students go on to successfully gain places on fashion or textiles design, fashion contour, graphic design and architecture courses to name a few. The art and design sector is vast, so there are many opportunities. It is essential to build up a good portfolio of evidence. The presentation of the course sketch books at interview days can lead to offers from universities, in some cases at the interview stage.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level French (PDF)

WJEC Eduqas A-Level French

Head of Department: Ms. Y. Sperry

Why study this course?

  • Communication and adaptability skills: An obvious benefit to learning a new language is to be able to communicate with the people who speak it including people you meet when travelling as well as people in your own community.
  • Cultural understanding: Speaking another language helps you to get to know about other people and cultures; it gives you a wider view of the world.
  • Brain power! Foreign language study can help to increase problem-solving skills, memory, self-discipline, grammatical and linguistic understanding of your own language.

Course outline

Summary of Subject Content:

  • Being a young person in French-speaking society
  • Understanding the French-speaking world
  • Diversity and Difference
  • France 1940-1950: The Occupation and post-war years June 1940–May 1945

"Les Choristes", a feature film by the director Christophe Barratier

"L'Etranger" – a novel by Albert Camus

How am I assessed?

Component 1.Speaking (21-23 minutes)  (30% of A-level)

Task 1- Presentation and discussion of an independent research topic of an aspect that interests you related to the countries or communities where French is spoken.

Task 2 – Discussion based on a written stimulus

Component 2.  Listening, Reading & Translation (2h30) (50% of A-level)

Listening – True/False answers, multiple choice answers, answers to questions in French

Reading – Gap fill tasks and answers to questions in French

Translation – One translation into English. One translation into French. (100 words each)

Component 3. Critical response in writing. (2 hours) (20% of A-level)

Two essays of 300 words each; on the film and one on the novel in which you write a critical response referring to characters, themes, structure and social & historical context.

Where does this course lead?

MFL students in the UK find it easier to get jobs and there is a wider choice of jobs for MFL students.

By choosing languages, you're enhancing your career options. Language graduates have a whole range of career opportunities open to them, including manufacturing, sales, banking/finance, community/social services, transport/communications.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Further Maths (PDF)

Pearson A-Level Further Mathematics

Head of Department: Mrs. L.Wiles

Department Information

We have a strong team of of 4 Further Mathematics subject specialists.

Students are required to purchase their own texts and revision resources.

Why study this course?

Studying Further Mathematics will:

  • provide a stimulating and challenging course
  • develop key employability skills such as problem-solving, logical reasoning, communication and resilience;
  • increase knowledge and understanding of mathematical techniques and their applications
  • support the study of other A level subjects
  • provide excellent preparation for a wide range of university courses
  • lead to a versatile qualification that is well-respected by employers and higher education

Aims of the course

This course is intended to extend and develop the mathematical knowledge and skills that you obtain when studying A-level Mathematics. It is aimed at those who have a real passion for the subject and want to take up additional Mathematics. Mathematics A Level is sufficient for most students and Further Mathematics is only taken by the more able who aim to study mathematical subjects at degree level.

Course outline

Further Mathematics is an additional A level qualification taken alongside A level Mathematics.

It is designed to stretch and challenge able mathematicians introducing new techniques and  concepts such as complex numbers and matrices.

It is excellent preparation for degree courses in mathematics and other mathematical subjects.

How am I assessed?

There is no coursework in Maths. Progress is monitored by regular tests and home works.  There are also mock exams for each module as the time for exams approaches.

There are 4 equally weighted exams at the end of the course.

Where does this course lead?

​The Further Maths course is suitable for students with a particular interest and ability in Maths and provides a firm foundation for further study in Maths and subjects that rely heavily on Maths such as Physics and a number of Engineering disciplines.  A Further Maths qualification often facilitates university entrance for these subjects.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Geography (PDF)

WJEC Eduqas GCE A Level Geography​

Head of Department: Mr. S. Knight

Department Information

The Geography department comprises seven members of staff who share five dedicated Geography classrooms. Computer rooms and iPads are regularly used to support learning. The department organises a range of field trips each year for different year groups.​

Why study this course?

You will learn in a wide variety of ways such as by using maps, GIS skills, data analysis, photos, videos, podcasts, as well as attending lectures and fieldwork study days. You will be encouraged to frame your own questions using higher level thinking skills and showing your grasp of complex issues through report and essay writing.

Aims of the course

The A-Level Geography specification encourages students to apply geographical knowledge, theory and skills to the world around them. In turn, this will enable students to develop a critical understanding of the world’s people, places and environments in the 21st century. Students should be able to develop both knowledge and understanding of contemporary geographical concepts together with transferable skills that will enable students to progress to higher education and a range of employment opportunities.

Course outline

Your A Level geography course will cover both the physical and human environments and the complex interaction of processes that shape our world. It will also, importantly, show the applied side of the subject - how human intervention affects the environment and how people adapt and mitigate the effects of processes on their environment. This is complex and dynamic and varies from place to place depending on people’s resources, technology and culture. There is plenty of room for discussion and extended research which will help you become an independent thinker and learner.

How am I assessed?

Components 1-3 are worth 80% of the course and are assessed through three exams at the end of the two years.

Component 4 is an independent investigation (coursework) that is worth 20%.

Throughout the two years home​work, past paper questions, projects, field work and presentations will be assessed and students will sit mock examinations.

Where does this course lead?

Geography combines well with both arts and science subjects. For careers in sustainability and green issues, urban regeneration, energy supply, retail location, managing the effects of hazards and climate change, geography is an obvious choice.

For careers in the world of business, an understanding of global economics forms an important part of geography. If you are thinking of a career in law, human rights, international relations or welfare then geography gives you the opportunity to consider relevant issues such as; How do we measure development?If you are working towards a future course in medicine or veterinary medicine then geography is a good choice to give your A Level options the breadth that universities seek, as you will gain a clear understanding of how the environment affects health and survival of people, animals and ecosystems as well as enhancing your skills of writing essays and extended reports.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Health and Social Care (PDF)

BTEC Level 3 National Diploma in Health and Social Care​

Head of Department: Ms. L. Jepson

Department Information

We have an excellent team of subject teachers who are ​​enthusiatstic and able to guide you through the course, each with their own specialisms and interests.​

Why study this course?

The BTEC course enables you to enhance your interpersonal skills, which in turn assists you in the production of coursework to a very high standard. Throughout the course you will undertake activities designed to enhance your knowledge and understanding of all aspects of health, education and working with people.  Some will involve classroom activities and others will require you to undertake primary research into real organisations.

Aims of the course

Develop and sustain an interest in health, early years (care and education), social care and    issues affecting the care sector:

  • Develop skills that will enable you to make an effective contribution to the care sector including skills of research, evaluation and problem solving in a work related context
  • Prepare you for further study and training

Course outline

​​You will undertake both coursework and exam units underpinned by work experience in a Health and Social Care setting​.

Your vocational BTEC comprises of a number of subject units. Each unit has been researched and written to standards agreed by the QCA.  These specifications highlight a range of subject topics that must be covered.

Each unit either assessed through your portfolio work or by an externally set examination.  Although portfilio work is internally marked and moderated by the Health & Social Care team, final assessment and grading is awarded by the exam board.

  • Two Units for the Single BTEC award undertaken in year 12 and 13, one assessed through an externally marked exam and one through internal assessed coursework.
  • Two units for the Double BTEC award undertaken in year 12, both assessed through internally moderated coursework.
  • Two units for the Double BTEC award undertaken in year 13, one assessed through an externally marked exam and one through internal assessed coursework​.​

How am I assessed?

Ongoing assessed reports                                        Coursework submission

Observations in class and on placements              End of topic tests                   Final exams

Where does this course lead?

​Entrance to a variety of University Courses as well as Apprenticeships in the HSC field.

Career related professions.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level History (PDF)

OCR A Level History

Head of Department: Mrs. B. Fullthorpe

Department Information

​The department is made up of a dedicated, enthusiastic and experienced team of teachers who are here to help support you through the A Level course. We have acess to a well stocked library, with access to the latest publications and make frequent use of this, along side ICT, iPads and textbooks to facilitate learning.

Why study this course?

History is a facsinating subject in its own right, but with a qualification in History, you could go on to Higher education or you could work in a great variety of jobs. Employers value the research, analytical, teamwork and communication skills that History students develop during their studies – so its really a very useful subject to study!

Course outline

Britain 1930-1997 (Enquiry topic: Churchill 1930-1951)

This topic focuses on recent  British history, looking at the key figures, political, economic and foreign issues of the later twentieth century. This topic contains some radical changes including the development of the welfare state, the power of the Trade Unions and the demise of the British Empire. There is a clear focus on contemporary sources, in particular when studying the enquiry topic on Winston Churchill.

Russia 1894-1941

This topic focuses on the transition from Tsarist Russia to a Communist Authoritarian state. The course covers the rule of Nicholas II, his character and attitude as well as the threats to his authority. The First World War and the end of Tsarist rule, the Civil War and the establishment of Lenin’s rule. The course extends to include the rule of Stalin, his key advisors and adversaries and the effects of Communist policies on Russia.

Civil Rights in the USA 1865-1992

This theme focuses on the struggle of citizens in the United States to gain equality before the law. The course covers four sections of American society; African Americans, Trade Unions, Native American Indians and Women, looking in detail at how each fought to achieve Civil Rights in nineteenth and twentieth century America. Within this there are several depth studies focusing on the effect of the New Deal and key individuals such as Malcom X on the development of Civil Rights.

Coursework: Nazi Germany

This unit is comprised of an independently researched essay of 3000-4000 words. This needs to be based around a historical issue and must make use of a range of primary and secondary material. We are currently advising students to consider Nazi Germany as a topic, but there is the opportunity to undertake research into another topic if a student wishes.

How am I assessed?

At the end of your second year of study (Year 13), you will be examined in three units. You will sit a separate exam for each unit:

  • Britain 1930-1997
  • Russia 1894-1941
  • Civil Rights in the USA, 1865-1992

The coursework unit will be internally assessed and externally moderated. It will be completed by February of Year 13

Where does this course lead?

​History develops a variety of cross-curricular skills in both written and verbal comminication skills. Therefore, it can lead to higher education and a career in law, teaching or working in museums and libraries.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level IT (PDF)

Cambridge Technicals Information Technology Level 3: ​​Foundation Diploma in IT

Head of Department: Mr. G Taylor

Department Information

​Up to date Intel Nuc Computers specifically for Computing & ICT students. Software inlcuding the latest verion of Microsoft Office, Visual Studio 2012, Construct 2, Unity, Python 3 and other software packages including Photoshop, Fireworks, Flash and Dreamweaver.​

Why study this course?

Offers fantastic career paths including:

  • Games Designer
  • Digital Marketing Expert
  • Mobile Application Designer
  • Technical Support
  • Web Designer

Aims of the course

To provide a good understanding of:

  • Fundamentals of ICT
  • Global Information
  • Mobile App design
  • Games Design and Prototyping
  • Social Media
  • Internet of things

Course outline

Cambridge Technicals from OCR is a vocational qualification in ICT at Level 3 for students aged 16+.  Students will follow a specific pathway with each having a set of coursework units to choose from. These range from Mobile Design and Virtual Reality to Web Development, Game Development and even animation.

How am I assessed?

Assessment:

3 Course​work Units (60%)

2 Examined Units (40%)

Where does this course lead?

​This course will allow you to go on and study Computing, ICT, Software Development, Games Design, Graphics, Web Development and will provide job opportunities in a number of areas.​

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Maths (PDF)

Pearson A-Level Mathematics

Head of Department: Mrs. L. Wiles

Department Information

In the department we have six specialist A level Maths teachers.

Students are required to purchase their own course text that supports the teaching of the course.

Why study this course?

Studying Mathematics will:

  • provide a stimulating and challenging course
  • develop key employability skills such as problem-solving, logical reasoning, communication and resilience;
  • lead to a versatile qualification that is well-respected by employers and higher education

Aims of the course

The aims and objectives of this qualification are to enable students to:

  • understand mathematics and mathematical processes in a way that promotes confidence and fosters enjoyment
  • extend their range of mathematical skills and techniques, understand progression in mathematics and how different areas of mathematics are connected
  • construct mathematical proofs
  • recognise when mathematics can be used to analyse and solve a problem in context
  • take increasing responsibility for their own learning and the evaluation of their own mathematical development

Course outline

The  Edexcel Level 3 Advanced GCE in Mathematics consists of three externally examined papers.

Students must complete all assessment in May/June in any single year.

The first 2 papers focus on Pure Mathematics and the third looks at the applied units of Statisitcs and Mechanics.

How am I assessed?

Progress is monitored by regular synoptic tests and assessed home works. There are also mock exams for each module as the time for exams approaches.

There are 3 equally weighted exams at the end of the course.

Where does this course lead?

Universities welcome this subject for applications to study a wide range of degree courses.

Career opportunities include Engineering, Business,Finance, Medicine, Statisitics, Teaching, Lecturing, Law, Technology, Computing, Science.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Media (PDF)

OCR A-Level Media Studies

Head of Department: Mrs. S. White

Department Information

​The department currently has three passionate and enthusiastic teachers who have a wealth of experience teaching Media Studies and working in industry. We have lots of equipment to help stimulate student creativity including an Apple Mac suite, camcorders, DSLR cameras, green screen and a lighting kit.

Why study this course?

Whether you have studied GCSE Media Studies or not, you will find much to interest you on this course. You’ll learn a wealth of media terminiology and concepts in order to enhance your critical understanding and appreciation of the media. You will use a range of IT packages, extend your practical skills in a range of different media, build up your capacity for independent research and gain a deep understanding of the role the media plays in day-to-day life.

Aims of the course

You'll discover contemporary, diverse topics and engaging content, helping you to develop research and problem-solving skills as well as your creativity. You'll also refine your debating skills through the discussion of contemporary, contentious issues and in doing so will develop your knowledge and understanding of the global nature of the media. There will be ample opportunities provided for creative media production.

Course outline

Through studying A-Level Media Studies at CLCC, you will view, evaluate and analyse a variety of media products whilst developing practical skills spanning a range of media forms.

Throughout the course you will develop your knowledge of various media platforms such as news, advertsising and marketing, radio, film, video games, TV and online, social and participatory media. Some of the key texts you’ll study over the two year course are: The Jungle Book (1967 and 2016), Lucozade, Homeland, Daily Mail, Minecraft and The BBC Radio 1 Breakfast Show.

How am I assessed?

70% over two exams which includes long and short responses to a range of questions dealing with contemporary media issues and concepts.

30% practical coursework. You will will select and undertake a coursework project from a wide range of practical briefs designed to suit all skillsets and interests.

Where does this course lead?

Many of our students have progressed on to a range of different University degrees including Media Studies, Film Production, Advertising and PR, Game Design and Journalism.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Music (PDF)

AQA A-Level Music

Head of Department: Mrs. T. Brown

Department Information

​The music department is located in a purpose built block. There are two large teaching rooms, 6 individual practice rooms and a recording studio. A further teaching room is located in the nearby history block, housing 14 PCs and 10 iMac computers. These run specialist music software (i.e. Sibelius and Logic Pro). Students have ample opportunities to learn about music technology as well as more traditional elements of the subject. The department runs a number of thriving extra curricular ensembles and puts on regular concerts.

Why study this course?

A level music provides a natural progression from GCSE music and allows students with an interest and ability in all kinds of music to further explore all aspects of the subject. It is a challenging course, but also highly enjoyable and rewarding.

Aims of the course

The course aims to broaden students' musical understanding and appreciation across the areas of performing, composing, listening and appraising; allowing them to build upon their existing skills whilst also developing them further.

Course outline

Unit 1: Appraising

Written paper 2 hour 30 minutes

Section A contains structured listening questions using a CD of musical excerpts. Section B requires candidates to analyse set pieces from three different strands: The baroque concerto, The operas of Mozart and the piano music of Chopin, Brahms and Grieg. Finally section C requires an essay showing contextual understanding of music from a two further areas of study (Jazz and Musical Theatre).

Unit 2: Performing

Externally assessed. Candidates will offer two (or more) contrasting pieces to form a short programme (10 minutes) for either solo acoustic performance and/or performance via music technology. The expected standard is equivalent to grade 7.

Unit 3: Composing

Externally assessed coursework completed in controlled time. Candidates create two pieces of music, lasting four and half minutes in total. One piece is composed in response to an externally set brief. The second piece is a free choice of compositon.

How am I assessed?

​All units are assessed externally and performances are recorded at school on a given date in Year 13.

Compositions are undertaken as controlled assessment during lesson time. Listening and Apprasing is assessed by a written and listening examination.

Where does this course lead?

​Students who study music at A level often go on to study a variety of courses at undergraduate level. The music course provides a challenging opportunity for students to develop a range of skills from performing and composing, to listening and analysis, which are combined with a wider range of transferrable skills that enable them to succeed after they have completed their formal studies.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Music Technology (PDF)

Pearson A-Level Music Technology

Head of Department: Mrs. T. Brown

Department Information

​The music department is located in a purpose built block. There are two large teaching rooms, 6 individual practice rooms and a recording studio. A further teaching room is located in the nearby history block, housing 14 PCs and 10 iMac computers. These run specialist music software (i.e. Sibelius and Logic Pro). Students have ample opportunities to learn about music technology as well as more traditional elements of the subject. The department runs a number of thriving extra curricular ensembles and puts on regular concerts.

Why study this course?

The study of music technology provides opportunities for students to develop their creativity and imagination alongside such skills as analysis, appraising and project management. Students will develop the skills, knowledge and understanding needed to compose, sequence, record, analyse and produce music in the modern music industry.

Aims of the course

A Level Music Technology introduces students to the principles and practices of audio recording, the creation and manipulation of different types of sounds and the incorporation of these principles into their own music.

Course outline

The course entails 4 separate units: two of these are practical based and two are externally examined.

Unit 1: Recording. (20%) Students record one song from a choice of 10 set by the exam board. They use production tools and techniques to capture, edit, process and mix the final recording.

Unit 2: Technology based composition (20%). Students create a piece of music lasting 3 minutes from a choice of 3 briefs set by the exam board. The piece must include synthesis, sampling, manipulation of sounds and creative effects.

Unit 3: Listening and analysing (25%). A written exam consisting of 6 questions which are based on unfamilar commercial recordings. At least one queston will be a comparison of two unfamilar pieces and another will be an essay question.

Unit 4: Producing and Analysing (35%). Students will correct and mix a series of given audio material and MIDI data in order to create a final mix. They wll also be asked to write a response to an extended essay question.

How am I assessed?

​Coursework and final examination

Where does this course lead?

​A level Music Technology can lead to undergraduate study of Music Technology, Sound Technology, Sound Engineering or other related subjects.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level PE (PDF)

OCR A-Level Physical Education

Head of Department: Mr. N. Williams

Department Information:

The PE department is made up of 7 staff who are all experienced and committed to promoting PE and sport both through curricular and extra-curricular activities. The department has access to a large sports hall, gym, floodlit outdoor courts and extensive playing fields.

Why study this course?

Have you ever wondered...

  • Why some people can run faster than others?
  • How your personality affects your performance?
  • How you could become an elite sports performer?
  • Why people take drugs?
  • How technology can help you?

Study A Level Physical Education to help you understand the answers to these and many more questions in sport.

Aims of the course:

  • To develop theoretical knowledge and understanding of the factors that underpin physical activity and sport and use this knowledge to improve performance.
  • To study the theoretical areas that include: physiological, psychological, socio-cultural factors and the role of technology in sport.
  • Be able to perform effectively and analyse and evaluate performance.
  • Improve as an effective and independent learner.

Course outline:

Studying A Level Physical Education will give you an insight into the world of sports performance. Not only will you have the chance to perform or coach a sport through the non-exam assessment component, you will also develop a wide ranging knowledge into the how and why of physical activity and sport.

The combination of physical performance and academic challenge provides an exciting opportunity for students. You can perform, and then through the academic study improve your performance or coaching though application of the theory.

Physical Education is studied though a range of different contexts and the impact it has on both ours and other’s everyday lives. You will learn the reasons why we do things, why some people out perform others, mentally and physically. You will also delve into the ethical considerations behind the use of drugs and the influence that modern technology is having in and on physical activity and sport.

How am I assessed?

Non-Exam Assessment (NEA). One practical performance, as either a coach or a performer in an activity. NEA. One Performance Analysis task.

A total of four hours assessment split over three examination papers (2x 1 hour and 1x 2 hour) taken at the end of the two year course.

A wide range of question types including single mark, short answer and extended response questions.

The opportunity to demonstrate your knowledge of both theory and performance skills in both your NEA and through the examinations.

Where does this course lead?

A PE A-Level could lead to a variety of different professions or higher education courses including: physiotherapist, sports development, teaching/coaching, personal trainer, sports psychologist, sports science, nutritionist, sports centre management, outdoor activities.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Philosophy and Ethics (PDF)

OCR A-Level Religious Studies – Philosophy and Ethics

Head of Department: Mr. T. Pagkalis

Department Information

A new and exciting A Level for CLCC, building on a broad range of A Level teaching experience in the department. We have expertise from a Philosophical and Theological background to guide you through the course.

Why study the course?

Religious Studies offers you an interesting and intellectually challenging A Level. It helps develop an understanding of spiritual, moral, ethical, social and cultural issues. Religious Studies provides a space in the hectic world for reflection on some of the bigger philosophical questions that face our world in the twenty-first century and explore different approaches to dealing with them.  Religious Studies develops a variety of skills, including those of discussion and debate. The valuable skills of logical argument and critical evaluation are also developed and can be transferred to other areas of study.

Aims of the Course

Religious Studies is designed to allow time to develop your own ideas whilst exploring a range of views from other scholars and is a useful stepping stone to many careers where it helps to understand what people believe and how it affects their lives. For example, medicine, social work, law, the armed services, police force, journalism, teaching and many more.

Course Outline

The Course is divided into 3 parts:

In Philosophy of Religionlearners will study:

Ancient philosophical influences • the nature of the soul, mind and body • arguments about the existence or non-existence of God • the nature and impact of religious experience • the challenge for religious belief of the problem of evil • ideas about the nature of God • issues in religious language.

In Religion & Ethicslearners will study:

Normative ethical theories • the application of ethical theory to two contemporary issues of importance e.g. euthanasia, abortion etc • ethical language and thought • debates surrounding the significant idea of conscience • sexual ethics and the influence on ethical thought of developments in religious beliefs.

In Developments in Religious Thought(Christianity) learners will study:

Religious beliefs, values and teachings, their interconnections and how they vary historically and in the contemporary world • sources of religious wisdom and authority • practices which shape and express religious identity, and how these vary within a tradition • significant social and historical developments in theology and religious thought • key themes related to the relationship between religion and society

How am I assessed?

  • Philosophy of Religion - 120 marks, 2 hour written paper - 33.3% of total A Level
  • Religion and Ethics - 120 marks, 2 hour written paper - 33.3% of total A Level
  • Developments in Religious Thought in Christianity- 120 marks, 2 hour written paper – 33.3% of total A Level

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Physics (PDF)

OCR A-Level Physics A

Raising Standards Leader – Dr Pamela Derry

Department Information

The study of A level Physics with our experienced and well qualified Physics teachers begins with an introduction to the wide-ranging practical applications of Physics.  Our well-resourced department allows all lessons to be conducted in laboratories using specialist, technical equipment for the practical endorsement component of the course.  All students are issued with a course text on entry to the department and are expected to make regular use of the Pixl strategies provided to support and enhance their progress.

Why study this course?

Studying Physics will:

  • provide a stimulating and challenging course
  • develop key employability skills such as problem-solving, logical reasoning, communication and resilience;
  • support the study of other A level subjects
  • provide excellent preparation for a wide range of university courses
  • lead to a versatile qualification that is well-respected by employers and higher education

Aims of the course

To prepare students for a world where the application of physics is everywhere.  We prepare students for undergraduate degrees covering a range of physics specialisms.

Course outline

This course is an excellent preparation for any student planning to take a physics-rich degree. Students taking A level Physics will benefit enormously from taking Mathematics in their A level choices as well.

The Advanced Physics course emphasises the understanding of physics and its applicability to a wide variety of situations in industry and everyday life.  It also expects students to develop skills, attitudes and competencies that should be useful outside physics, especially those of individual investigation, the gaining of knowledge from a wide variety of sources, problem solving and communication skills. The thinking skills developed have wide-ranging applications in many careers. Students will be able to develop their knowledge, understanding and skills in an atmosphere of enjoyable enquiry. 

Physics - Year 1

Module 1 – Development of practical skills in physics

Module 2 – Foundations of Physics

Module 3 – Forces and motion

Module 4 – Electrons, waves and photons

Module 5 – Newtonian world and astrophysics

Module 6 – particles and medical physics

How am I assessed?

Progress is monitored by regular 6 week tests and assessed home work plus pixl support lessons to be completed outside of the laboratory in student’s personal study periods.

There are 3 exams at the end of the course:

  • Modelling physics - 100 marks 2hr 15min written exam assessing content of modules 1, 2, 3, 5   37% of full A-level
  • Exploring physics - 100 marks 2hr 15min written exam assessing content of modules 1, 2, 4, 6   37% of full A-level
  • Unified physics - 70 marks 1hr 30min written exam assessing content of modules 1-6   26% of full A-level
  • Practical endorsement in physics (not examined)

Where does this course lead?

​The course is fully accepted by further education establishments leading to degree courses in Physics, Mathematics, Engineering and related subjects.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Product Design (PDF)

A Level Product Design

Department Lead Mr. R Parker

Department Information

In order to correspond with industry working practices, students will be required to gain knowledge and understanding of CAD and theory at A level, students will also complete a design and making project of their designed prototype and also sit two externally assessed examinations. Here at Countesthorpe Leysland we have one of the best workshops of any college to help you achieve this.

Why study this course?

Students will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by producing prototypes of their choice. Students will gain a real understanding of what it means to be a designer, alongside the knowledge and skills sought by higher education and employers.

Course outline

A-level Product Design requires students to engage in both practical and theoretical study. This specification requires students to cover design and technology skills and knowledge as set out below.

Exam - Technical principles worth 30% of A level (2.5 hours)

Exam - Designing and making principles. worth 20% of A level (1.5 hours)

NEA -  substantial design and make project worth 50% of their A-level

Year 12
Students enhance the skills already gained from GCSE. This is in the form of a design and make brief

  • Drawing and cad enhancement project using sketch up and 3d printer
  • Practice NEA project to a set design brief
  • Theoretical exam preparation for mock exams in June of year 12
  • Start NEA - substantial design and make project worth 50% of their A-level

Year 13
NEA - substantial design and make project worth 50% of their A-level. Investigation into product design theory, in preparation for A level exams.

  • Exam - Technical principles worth 30% of A level (2.5 hours)
  • Exam - Designing and making principles. worth 20% of A level (1.5 hours)

Where does this course lead?

This qualification can lead to a place at university in an Art and Design related course. We have had many of students go on to successfully gain places on courses such as product design, graphic design and architecture courses. The art and design sector is vast, so there are many opportunities. It is essential to build up a good portfolio of evidence. The presentation of the course folders at interview days can lead to offers from universities in some cases at the interview stage.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Psychology (PDF)

AQA A-Level Psychology

Head of Department: Mrs. L. Smith

Department Information

Psychology is an extremely popular A-level at CLCC. Students enjoy the interactivity and practical approach to lessons.  Past students have praised the support received by staff and the enthusiasm shared for the subject. Psychology has a history of success with its results, with many students achieving or exceeding their target grade.

Why study this course?

Anyone who has a career interest that involves dealing with people should consider this course. Psychologists are known for their analytical and critical skills, as well as being well-regarded for their ability to communicate their ideas effectively.

Aims of the course

The course aims to enthuse the students with a passion for the subject. It looks in detail at everyday scenarios and concepts, analysing and explaining why they occur.  Students will learn how to conduct psychological investigations and a range of statistical analyses, alongside the different approaches and scientific branches of the subject.  As each of the examination papers includes 10% mathematical based questions, another aim of the course is also to embed a mathematical understanding and basic interpretation of results into student’s learning.

Course outline

Psychology is the scientific study of people's minds and behaviour. It examines issues such as how a person thinks, feels and behaves in the real world.  It is based on careful research of many different areas of human experience, many of which are covered across the two year course, such as:

  • Aggression - What are its causes?
  • Attraction - Who do we like and why?
  • Mental Illness - What are its causes? How can it be treated?
  • Memory - Why do we forget?
  • Development – What happens if we do not form an attachment as a child?
  • Biopsychology – How does your brain affect your behaviour?
  • Social – Why do you obey your teachers?... hopefully!

How am I assessed?

​All units are assessed externally by examination.   Three examinations taken at the end of Year 13. Students will also participate in internal assessments every 6-8 weeks, alongside mock examinations at Christmas and at the end of their Year 12.

Where does this course lead?

​The A-Level course is appropriate for students who wish to follow an academic path in Psychology, as it equips students with the knowledge and skills essential to both the mathematical and science disciplines.  Students have gone into many fields such as law, medicine, education and sport.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Sociology (PDF)

AQA A-Level Sociology​

Head of Department: Mr. D. Rushin

Department Information

Sociology students at CLCC attain exceptionally good grades. In recent years, well over half of Year-13 students attained an A*, A or B grade, around 75% have hit (or even beaten) their challenging target grades and the department has been judged as 'outstanding' compared to national standards.

Why study this course?

Sociology offers students insights into social, political, economic and cultural issues. It helps develop a critical understanding of: culture and identity, government policy, family life, inequality, crime, education, childhood, global relations, environmentalism and other aspects of society.

Aims of the course

A-Level Sociology aims to provide students with a greater understanding of society, and to arouse an interest in human social behaviour and a desire to explain it. As well as preparing students for success in exams, it aims to develop a range of skills that can be useful for a variety of careers.

Course outline

- Families and Householdsinvestigates changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation and divorce; the diversity of families and households with reference to gender roles and power; the nature of childhood; and demographic trends in the UK relating to birth rates, death rates and family size.

- Education explores the purpose of education; differing achievement between social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity; relationships and processes within schools; and the significance of educational policies including marketisation and 'the globalisation of education'.

- Sociological Methods explores a range of primary and secondary sociological research methods, including questionnaires, experiments, observation and interviews, and evaluates their usefulness.

- Global Development investigates why some societies have modernised while others remain under-developed. A range of concepts and phenomena are also studied, including 'globalisation', over-population, aid & debt, trade, 'urbanisation' and environment.

- Crime & Deviance explores definitions of 'crime' and 'deviance'; attempts to explain why some  groups seem to commit criminal and deviant acts while others conform to laws and 'social norms'. Other issues include: punishment, globalisation, the criminal justice process and crime-prevention.

- Theory & Methods explores sociology's relationship with government policy, and examines whether or not social research can ever be objective, unbiased and 'value free'. It also explores whether or not sociology should be considered a 'science' and whether or not society is 'postmodern'.

How is it assessed?

At the end of year-13, students sit 3 exam papers, all 2 hours long.

Where does the course lead?

While some Sociology students enter employment with a greater understanding of social, political and economic processes; many go on to university. Several CLCC Sociologists have gone on to study Sociology, Social Policy, International Relations, Criminology or Human Geography, for example.

Please click here to download the course information document for A Level Spanish (PDF)

WJEC Eduqas A-Level Spanish

Head of Department: Ms. Y. Sperry

Why study this course?

  • Communication and adaptability skills: An obvious benefit to learning a new language is to be able to communicate with the people who speak it including people you meet when travelling as well as people in your own community.
  • Cultural understanding: Speaking another language helps you to get to know about other people and cultures; it gives you a wider view of the world.
  • Brain power! Foreign language study can help to increase problem-solving skills, memory, self- discipline, grammatical and linguistic understanding of your own language.

Course outline

Two main themes in Year 12, plus the following:

  • Being a young person in Spanish-speaking society
  • Understanding the Spanish-speking world
  • Diversity and difference
  • The two Spains: 1936 onwards
    • “Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios" - feature film by director Pedro Almodóvar
    • A Spanish novel – El otro árbol de Guernica by Luisde Castresana

How am I assessed?

The WJEC A-level exam in the following components at the end of Year 13

Component 1. Speaking (21-23 minutes) (30% of A-level)

Task 1- Presentation and discussion of an independent research topic of an aspect that interests you related to the countries or communities where Spanish is spoken.
Task 2 – Discussion based on a written stimulus

Component 2. Listening, Reading & Translation (2h30) (50% of A-level)

Listening – True/False answers, multiple choice answers, answers to questions in Spanish Reading – Gap fill tasks and answers to questions in Spanish
Translation – One translation into English. One translation into Spanish. (100 words each)

Component 3. Critical response in writing. (2 hours) (20% of A-level)
Two essays of 300 words each; on the film and one on the novel in which you write a critical response referring to characters, themes, structure and social & historical context.

Where does this course lead?

MFL students in the UK find it easier to get jobs and there is a wider choice of jobs for MFL students. By choosing languages, you're enhancing your career options. Language graduates have a whole range of career opportunities open to them, including manufacturing, sales, banking/finance, community/social services, transport/communications.

 

Want to study with us?

If you are ready for the challenge, we're ready to help you reach your goals.

 

More able, High Achieving and Gifted & Talented Students

If you are a student who wants to attend a top university (Russell Group University) then Mrs K. Morris' presentation from our Sixth Open Evening will help you learn more about the skills required and the application process. If you have more questions please get in touch with Mrs K. Morris who will be happy to help you.